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Classes of Hyrule

Download the character sheet here.

Knight

Knights do not know how to use any magic. Instead, they have trained themselves in Hyrule’s many exotic and magic weapons. They compensate for their lack of magical abilities with proficiency in special attacks, such as the Helm Splitter.

At each level, Knights add 1d2 hearts to their overall health.

Key ability: None.
Class skills: Treat as Fighter.
Skill points at first level: Treat as Fighter.
Skill points at each additional level: Treat as Fighter.
Class features: Treat as Fighter.

Ÿ  Fighting techniques that knights may learn are as follows:

  • Ending Blow (level 1): If a Knight suspects that his enemy is near death, he may attempt an Ending Blow. If the enemy is indeed at 25% of its health and the strike succeeds, he finishes it off regardless of how much damage the strike would have actually done. If he misses, his sword gets stuck in the ground for one round.
  • Shield Attack (level 2): Use shield as a bludgeoning weapon without taking a penalty.
  • Back Slice (level 3): Move to flank an enemy even if the distance is more than usually allotted.
  • Helm Splitter (level 4): Strike once with the shield. If the shield blow hits, the Knight may flip over the enemy and roll another strike with a close-range, single-hand weapon.
  • Mortal Draw (level 5): Draw a weapon as a free action. Mortal Draw only works with bladed weapons, and cannot be used if the Knight does not strike with the weapon.
  • Jump Strike (level 6): After hitting the enemy directly in front, the Knight may roll a second time to attempt to strike the front enemy and two enemies to either side of it. This technique takes a full round.
  • Great Spin (Level 7): This move takes two rounds. In round one, the Knight charges his sword. In round two, the Knight strikes all enemies in the squares touching his. The Knight will lose the charge if he is struck between round one and round two.
  • Up Thrust (Level 8): The Knight can thrust his sword up into the enemy’s chin, doing double damage.

Hero

Heroes do a little bit of everything–some fighting and some magic. Heroes have access to a little bit of all the kinds of magic, as well as a few of the fighting techniques otherwise reserved for Knights.

A Hero’s magic meter is determined by the character’s highest Attribute score–Courage, Power, or Wisdom. That number is equal to the number of Magic Points that the character has to spend on magic spells. Heroes may perform any kind of magic; however, their Magic Points are limited.

At each level, Heroes roll 2d3. Those points may be distributed among the character’s total Courage, Power, and Wisdom scores (but do not affect the attributes used to determine the original score).

The number of spells, blessings, and magic-related songs that a Hero may know is the same as his Hero level plus one.

At each level, Heros add 1 heart to their overall health.

Fighting techniques that Heroes may know are as follows:

  • Ending Blow (level 1): If a Hero suspects that his enemy is near death, he may attempt an Ending Blow. If the enemy is indeed at 25% of its health and the strike succeeds, he finishes it off regardless of how much damage the strike would have actually done. If he misses, his sword gets stuck in the ground for one round.
  • Shield Attack (level 4): Use shield as a bludgeoning weapon without taking a penalty.
  • Back Slice (level 7): Move to flank an enemy even if the distance is more than usually allotted.
  • Helm Splitter (level 10): Strike once with the shield. If the shield blow hits, the Hero may flip over the enemy and roll another strike with a close-range, single-hand weapon.

Key ability: None.
Class skills: Treat as Fighter.
Skill points at first level: Treat as Fighter.
Skill points at each additional level: Treat as Fighter.
Class features: Treat as Fighter.

Minstrel

Minstrels travel throughout Hyrule, performing for eager crowds–and gathering information along the way. A minstrel is often a trusted familiar whose visits bring news of the outside world. Minstrels often use a bit of magic to protect themselves during their travels.

A minstrel’s magic is determined by the character’s Wisdom score. That number is equal to the number of Magic Points that the character has to spend on spells. Minstrels can only use Wisdom and Shadow-related blessings, spells, and songs.

At each level, minstrels roll 2d3. Those points are added to the character’s total Wisdom score (but do not affect the attributes used to determine the original Courage score.)

The number of spells, blessings, and magic-related songs that a Minstrel may know is the same as his Minstrel level plus one.

At each level, Minstrels add 1 heart to their overall health.

Key ability: Wisdom.
Class skills: Treat as Bard.
Skill points at first level: Treat as Bard.
Skill points at each additional level: Treat as Bard.
Class features: Treat as Bard.

Sage

While almost everyone in Hyrule can use a little magic, there are some who specialize in it. Each spell comes from one of the goddesses, and all Sages must meet the minimum Courage, Power, or Wisdom score required to cast it.

A Sage’s magic is determined by the character’s combined Courage, Power, and Wisdom scores. That number is equal to the number of Magic Points that the character has to spend on spells. Minstrels can use any kind of magic.

At each level, Sages roll 2d6. Those points may be distributed among the character’s total Courage, Power, and Wisdom scores (but do not affect the attributes used to determine the original score).

The number of spells, blessings, and magic-related songs that a Sage may know is the double his Sage level plus two.

At each level, Sages add 1 heart to their overall health.

Key ability: Any.
Class skills: Treat as Sorcerer.
Skill points at first level: Treat as Sorcerer.
Skill points at each additional level: Treat as Sorcerer.
Class features: Treat as Sorcerer.

Slayer

Slayers are fighters, trained to find and kill the enemy through any means, physical or magical. Some Slayers take dirty jobs–mercenaries and assassins. Others use their skills to protect.

A Slayer’s magic is determined by the character’s Power score. That number is equal to the number of Magic Points that the character has to spend on spells. Slayers can only use Power and Shadow-related blessings, spells, and songs.

At each level, Slayers roll 2d3. Those points are added to the character’s total Power score (but do not affect the attributes used to determine the original Power score.)

The number of spells, blessings, and magic-related songs that a Slayer may know is the same as his Slayer level plus one.

At each level, Slayers add 1 heart to their overall health.

Key ability: Power.
Class skills: Treat as Fighter.
Skill points at first level: Treat as Fighter.
Skill points at each additional level: Treat as Fighter.
Class features: Treat as Fighter.

Thief

Thieves are tricky characters, bold and sly. Their skills aren’t strictly relegated to thievery, though that is their specialty. Thieves often use a bit of magic to aid them in their capers.

A Thief’s magic meter is determined by the character’s Courage score. That number is equal to the number of Magic Points that the character has to spend on spells. Thieves can only use Courage-related spells. Thieves can only use Courage and Shadow-based blessings/spells/songs.

At each level, thieves roll 2d3. Those points are added to the character’s total Courage score (but do not affect the attributes used to determine the original Courage score.)

The number of spells, blessings, and magic-related songs that a Thief may know is the same as his Thief level plus one.

At each level, Thieves add 1 heart to their overall health.

Key ability: Courage.
Class skills: Treat as Rogue.
Skill points at first level: Treat as Rogue.
Skill points at each additional level: Treat as Rogue.
Class features: Treat as Rogue.

3 comments

  1. I would not use any of these.
    I’ll use the Base classes from D&D thank you.


    • I don’t know whether to say this is just lazy or incomplete to the point of uselessness


  2. The parts where it says to roll a d2/3 confuses since I’ve seen d4, 6, 8, 10/%, 12 and 20; what does it imply?



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